Ancestral Lines of Jared Handspicker
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Frederick G. Rowe (M)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Frederick G. Rowe is the son of Ralph Burtt Rowe and Nellie S. Cooper.

Virginia Rowe (F)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Virginia Rowe is the daughter of Stephen Smith Rowe and Mrs. Rowe.

Georgia UNKNOWN (F)
b. circa 1888

     Her married name was Rowe. Georgia UNKNOWN was born circa 1888 at Washington, USA. She married Frank Ara Rowe, son of Asa Mortimer Rowe and Lizzie N. Cornell, between 1918 and 1920 at Thurston County, Washington, USA.

John Howard Dunbar (M)
b. 23 May 1890, d. 6 March 1936
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     John Howard Dunbar 1930 Census, married to Lena, now listed AS Attorney General, and Lena as a clerk in his office.

The home built in Olympia in 1920, where young Dorothy was to grow up, is now a historical home, called the 'John H. Dunbar House' at 426 - 17th Ave. SE.

In the 1920 US Census, perhaps while that home was being built, John H. Dunbar lived with his in-laws at 111 W. 13th Ave.
From an article by Freelance Writer, Heather Lockman:

The man who first owned our bungalow had been someone named John H. Dunbar. Whoever he was, I had reached the end of the line. Would Dunbar, after all, turn out to be the very first capitol gardener? Back at the library once again, I reached for a city directory. Whatever it said on those pages, I couldn’t change history. Dufault, Duffin, Duke …

'Dunbar, John H. (Marie R.); Attorney General.' I read it again, and then again, afraid to trust what I saw. But the names matched the property records, and the address matched the house. A Washington State attorney general, at least as good a catch as the capitol grounds keeper.

John Dunbar, I discovered, had not led a long and happy life. Most of his time in office, from 1923 to 1932, he spent wrangling with a hotheaded governor who tormented him by ordering him to pursue ridiculous cases. At the height of Prohibition, Dunbar turned to alcohol. Repeated arrests for drunk driving threatened his re-election in 1928, and he died at forty-five from what reporters called 'a liver ailment.'

By then Marie had divorced him and moved out, taking the baby, Dorothy, the daughter for whom they had papered the nursery walls with castles and elves. Marie went on, within a few years, to a long and successful run as chief society writer for the Seattle Times. Dorothy, the child raised on fairies, grew up to write Blood in the Parlor, a collection of true murder tales. A secondhand bookstore found me a copy in Kalamazoo, Michigan. There’s a picture of Dorothy on the back cover; she looks just like Marie.

Our home is now an official Olympia Heritage Site, with a bronze marker declaring it the John H. Dunbar House. It’s the house where the Dunbars were happy, at least for a little while, when the Great War was finally over and the future seemed ripe with hope. Dorothy died young, like her father, without leaving any heirs. But the plaque guarantees that the Dunbars will never quite disappear. He was born on 23 May 1890 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. He was the son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White. John Howard Dunbar married Marie Gladys (Gladiss) Rowe, daughter of Asa Mortimer Rowe and Lizzie N. Cornell, on 12 August 1917 at Olympia, Thurston County, Washington, USA. John Howard Dunbar married Lena A. UNKNOWN circa 1929 at Washington, USA. John Howard Dunbar died on 6 March 1936 at Olympia, Thurston County, Washington, USA, at age 45.

Child of John Howard Dunbar and Marie Gladys (Gladiss) Rowe
Dorothy Dunbar (living)

Lena A. UNKNOWN (F)
b. circa 1891

     Lena A. UNKNOWN 2nd wife of John Dunbar. Her married name was Dunbar. She was born circa 1891 at Washington, USA. She married John Howard Dunbar, son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White, circa 1929 at Washington, USA.

Dorothy Dunbar (F)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Dorothy Dunbar is the daughter of John Howard Dunbar and Marie Gladys (Gladiss) Rowe.

Ralph Oregon Dunbar (M)
b. 26 April 1845, d. 19 September 1912
Pop-up Pedigree

     Ralph Oregon Dunbar IL, OH, PA (him, father, mother). He was surely in WA by 1870 census, a single lawyer from Illinois. In 1850, his father's family was already headed west, as they were enumerated in Marion, OR that year.

1892 Census of Thurston Co, WA:
DUNBAR:
R.O., 47, m, judge - supreme court - OR
Clara, 40, f, WA
Frederick, 11, m, WA
Ruth, 9, f, WA
John, 2, m, WA


In 1910, Ralph was a judge on the state supreme court! Enumerated in Olympia, Thurston Co, WA.

Based on 1880 location, wonder if Ralph was brother of W. R. Dunbar, also of Goldendale in1880, a farmer b. @1839, IL, shows parents as OH, PA, as well (though Ralph showed PA/PA in 1880, in later records, it's corrected to OH/PA)

1880 US Census for Goldendale, Klickitat Co, WA:

DUNBAR:
R.O., w, m, 35, lawyer, IL, PA, PA
Clara, w, f, 28, wife, keep house, OR, IN, OH
Wells/Wills, w, m, 5, son, WA, IL, OR
Chester, w, m, 4, son, WA, IL, OR
Trot, w, f, 2, dau, WA, IL, OR

Washington State Justices:
Ralph Oregon Dunbar, served Nov. 11, 1889-Sept. 19, 1912 (died)
Chief Justice Jan. 9, 1911-Sept. 19, 1912

----------------------------------------------

An Illustrated History of the State of Washington, by Rev. H.K. Hines, D.D., The
Lewis Publishing Co., Chicago, IL., 1893, pages 394-395
     
     JUDGE RALPH OREGON DUNBAR, of Goldendale, Washington, Chief Justice of the
State of Washington, was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, April 26, 1845. His
parents, Rice and Jane (Brisbin) Dunbar, were natives of Ohio and Pennsylvania
respectively, but were married in Illinois, where both were reared from
childhood.
     Rice Dunbar was a carpenter by trade and followed that occupation in
Illinois until 1846. That year he purchased a prairie outfit, and with ox teams
brought his family across the plains and mountains to the Willamette valley,
Oregon. He located a donation claim in the Waldo hills, Marion county, and there
engaged in farming, continuing his trade, as opportunity afforded, up to 1863.
Then he moved his family to Salem, where he passed the closing years of his
life.
     Judge Dunbar was educated at the Willamette University, teaching two years
while pursuing his studies. In 1867 he moved to Olympia and commenced the study
of law in the office of Hon. Elwood Evans, and was admitted to practice before
the Territorial Supreme Court in 1859. His career as a lawyer has been marked by
success, he has had an extensive practice throughout the State, and he has
gained a reputation not only as a successful lawyer but also as one whose
judgment can always be relied upon. That same year, 1869, he was appointed Clerk
of the United States District Court by Chief Justice Orange Jacobs, and
performed the duties of that office until 1871, when he resigned, went to
Yakima, and engaged in the practice of his profession, continuing there thus
occupied until 1875. He then moved to The Dalles, Oregon, and passed two years
at that place. Returning to Washington in 1877, he opened an office in
Goldendale and continued his professional life. In 1878 he was elected to the
Upper House or Council of the Territorial Legislature, and was also elected
Probate Judge of Klickitat county. In 1880 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney
for Klickitat, Kittitass, Yakima, Clarke and Skamania counties, In 1885 he was
elected to the Lower House of the Territorial Legislature, and upon the
assemblage of that body was elected Speaker of the House. He also served several
terms as City Attorney of Goldendale, and from 1880 to 1836 was editor and
proprietor of the Goldendale Sentinel, a paper which zealously supported the
principles of the Republican party. The Judge represented the eleventh district
in the Constitutional Convention in 1889, and was appointed chairman of the
Committee on Tide and Granted Lands, and was the author of the constitutional
articles on school lands. He was a prominent candidate for Congress at the first
State convention in Washington in 1889, lacking only three votes of the
nomination. At the same convention he was unanimously nominated as candidate for
the office of Supreme Judge, to which responsible position he was elected by a
large majority the following month. In January, 1893, after serving two years as
Associate Justice, Judge Dunbar was chosen by his brother judges to fill the
responsible and honorable position as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the
State of Washington -- a position he now occupies -- discharging the duties with
credit to himself and friends and to the satisfaction of the public in general.
     Being of a nervous temperament, Judge Dunbar sought and has found rest and
recreation in agricultural pursuits. He bought 280 acres of land near
Goldendale, and became interested in grain farming and the raising of horses.
After his election as Supreme Judge, he removed to Olympia, and while
discharging the duties of that office, in order to continue his farming
diversion, he purchased 170 acres of land near Olympia. On this property h is
raising fine horses of Hambletonian Mambrino and Altamont breeds, and some
Jersey cattle.
     Judge Dunbar was married at Yakima, in 1873, to Miss Clara, daughter of
William White, a pioneer of 1852. Her father was murdered while engaged in
farming, six miles southeast of Olympia, during the Indian war of 1855 and 1856.
Judge and Mrs. Dunbar have three children, -- Fred, Ruth and John, -- all busily
engaged in the pursuit of education.
     
Submitted to the WA. Bios Project in September 2003 by Jeffrey L. Elmer
     
     
* * * *

Notice: These biographies were transcribed for the Washington Biographies
Project. Unless otherwise stated, no further information is available on the
individual featured in the biographies.

Additionally, from the published history of the Goldendale Sentinel, Goldendale, WA:

DUNBAR FIRST EDITOR

Three directors were elected annually, one of them to be selected to take charge of the company's affairs. Ralph Oregon Dunbar was made the first manager. DUNBAR later became chief justice of the Supreme Court at Olympia, and to this day is considered one of the greatest judges in the history of the state.
At this time the paper was to be politically neutral, as both parties were represented among the shareholders who were W.H. Boyd, William Cumming, W.R. DUNBAR, J.T. Eshelman, J.M. Hess, Ophelia Cram. T.L. Masters, Joseph Nesbitt, C.S. Reinhart, E.B. Wise, R.O. DUNBAR, Wm. Van Vactor, Frederick Eshelman, G.W. Stapleton, J.M. Luark W.J. Story.
Neutrality, in a political sense, was hard to maintain, and the columns of The Sentinel became more and more Republican.
The fire of 1888, which swept over the town taking all but three business houses and making 25 families homeless, also burned The Sentinel, with an estimated damage of $3,500. The paper did not stop publication, however, but the copy was taken to The Dalles Mountaineer office, where it was published and returned to Goldendale. This May 17 issue carried a story of the fire on the front page with a tiny headline titled, 'The Fire.'

As is clearly seen, both William R. Dunbar and Ralph O. Dunbar were shareholders of the paper, as well. He was born on 26 April 1845 at Schuyler County, Illinois, USA. He was the son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin. Ralph Oregon Dunbar married Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White, daughter of William White, in 1873 at Yakima County, Washington, USA. Ralph Oregon Dunbar died on 19 September 1912 at Washington, USA, at age 67.

Children of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White
Wells Ralph Dunbar b. 30 Oct 1874
Chester Copperfield Dunbar b. 30 Jan 1876
Betsey Trotwood 'Trot' Dunbar b. 25 Oct 1877
Frederick Dunbar+ b. 30 Dec 1880
Ruth Martin Dunbar+ b. 12 Sep 1882
John Howard Dunbar+ b. 23 May 1890, d. 6 Mar 1936

Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White (F)
b. 28 June 1852
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Dunbar. Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White Have seen her listed as Clara Asseneth White in some birth records. In 1900 US Census for Tacoma, Pierce Co, WA, she's actually listed as 'Mary' of all things! However, by 1910, back to being Clara. :-)

Showed a 5/4 child count in 1900 US Census for Tacoma, WA.

In 1920 US Census, as a widow, Clara living solo in the Capital Apartments, #104, in Olympia, WA. She was born on 28 June 1852 at Portland, Multnomah Couny, Oregon, USA. She was the daughter of William White. Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White married Ralph Oregon Dunbar, son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin, in 1873 at Yakima County, Washington, USA.

Children of Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White and Ralph Oregon Dunbar
Wells Ralph Dunbar b. 30 Oct 1874
Chester Copperfield Dunbar b. 30 Jan 1876
Betsey Trotwood 'Trot' Dunbar b. 25 Oct 1877
Frederick Dunbar+ b. 30 Dec 1880
Ruth Martin Dunbar+ b. 12 Sep 1882
John Howard Dunbar+ b. 23 May 1890, d. 6 Mar 1936

Frederick Dunbar (M)
b. 30 December 1880
Pop-up Pedigree

     Frederick Dunbar Name: Fred Dunbar
City: Seattle
County: King
State: Washington
Birth Date: 30 Dec 1880
Race: White
Roll: 1991888
DraftBoard: 2
Listed wife as Eva. He was born on 30 December 1880 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. He was the son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White. Frederick Dunbar married Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway on 4 March 1913 at Portland, Multnomah Couny, Oregon, USA.

Children of Frederick Dunbar and Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway
William Dunbar (living)
Ralph Oregon Dunbar (living)

Ruth Martin Dunbar (F)
b. 12 September 1882
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Davis. Ruth Martin Dunbar was born on 12 September 1882 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. She was the daughter of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White. Ruth Martin Dunbar married Gilbert W. Davis, son of Horace W. Davis and Ida UNKNOWN, circa 1910 at Washington, USA.

Children of Ruth Martin Dunbar and Gilbert W. Davis
Horace Gilbert Davis (living)
Mary C. Davis (living)

Wells Ralph Dunbar (M)
b. 30 October 1874
Pop-up Pedigree

     Wells Ralph Dunbar was born on 30 October 1874 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. He was the son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White.

Chester Copperfield Dunbar (M)
b. 30 January 1876
Pop-up Pedigree

     Chester Copperfield Dunbar was born on 30 January 1876 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. He was the son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White.

Betsey Trotwood 'Trot' Dunbar (F)
b. 25 October 1877
Pop-up Pedigree

     Betsey Trotwood 'Trot' Dunbar was born on 25 October 1877 at Goldendale, Kilickitat County, Washington, USA. She was the daughter of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White.

Rice Dunbar (M)
b. 6 February 1802, d. 15 September 1870

     Rice Dunbar Listed in Marion Co as early as 1845, then in 1849, at Champoeg Co, and back in 1850 to Marion, shown as in area of 'Howell Prairie Precinct in 1860. In Salem, OR for 1870 Census, looks like daughter Adelia was keeping house for him, though she was listed as 37, and should have been closer to 27.

1850 US Census for Marion County, OR:

DUNBAR:
Rice?, 48, m, carpenter, OH
Jane, 42, f, PA
Elizabeth, 14, IL
William, 11, IL (likely the W.R. seen same locale as Ralph in later census)
Emely, 10, f, IL
Adalia, 8, f, IL
Ralph, 6, m, IL
Oscar 3, m, IL (OR)
Elizabeth, 1, f, IL (OR)

1860 US Census for Howell Prairie, Marion Co, OH (Silverton P.O.):
DUNBAR:

Rice, 58, m, carpenter, b. OH
W. R., 21, m, farmer, IL
E., 19, f, IL
A. 17, f, IL
R.O. 15, m, IL
O, 12, m, OR
E, 10, f, OR

Curiously... that same year, in Putnam Co, IL is listed a Rice Dunbar, aged 2, son of Hiram R. Dunbar, who was b. 1804 in (OH) One wonders... might there have been something of a connection between Hiram and Rice?, b. but 2 years apart? Likely it was THAT Rice (b. IL) who was a sergeant in the B Co, 77th Illinois Infantry (Musician), listed as Rice O. Dunbar. He likely married Rachel 'Griner' 21-May-1868, Henry Co, IL. SOME records on Hiram indicate HE was b. OH! In fact, Jemima Wolf and Hiram R. Dunbar were married in Knox (Co?), OH on 10-Jan-1828. Hiram lived to at least 1880, where he indicates parents also b. OH. Hiram purchased land in IL in 1835 and 1840. The OH/IL connection, and the common name of 'Rice' tell ME there's a connection here, and that there's a fair to good chance that Hiram R. and Rice are brothers.

From his son's biography:
Rice Dunbar was a carpenter by trade and followed that occupation in Illinois until 1846. That year he purchased a prairie outfit, and with ox teams brought his family across the plains and mountains to the Willamette valley, Oregon. He located a donation claim in the Waldo hills, Marion county, and there engaged in farming, continuing his trade, as opportunity afforded, up to 1863. Then he moved his family to Salem, where he passed the closing years of his life.

Schuyler County, Illinois - Biographies

SOURCE: THE GAZETTE (BEARDSTOWN, IL) FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1847 S. EMMONS, EDITOR

BELOW IS AN A LETTER THAT WAS WRITTEN TO JAMES LAWLER,ESQ FROM RICE DUNBAR AND IT WAS PUBLISHED IN ‘THE GAZETTE’ (note I have typed it just as it appeared-tlb)

From Oregon.
OREGON TERRITORY, Champoeg
Count, April 26, 1847.

To JAMES LAWLER, Esq:
Dear Sir- When I last wrote to you from Fort Hall, we were full of the belief that our journey would soon be at an end. But O! despair. We had the finest time to Fort Hall that could be thought of. Good road, good grass, and every thing went on well, untill we left the old road, 40 miles down Snake River, from Fort Hall; here we were induced by Mr. Applegate to take what he called his new route. We traveled south about 500 miles-here we left the California road, and took a course for the head of the Clamit River. Here we were beset with the worst and most savage tribes of Indians in all the country- - they drove off all the cattle and horses they could lay hands on. At length we arrived at the Umqua Mountains, 200 miles from the head of the Wallamette Valley-here the rain set in on the 28th day of October; we undertook to go through the mountains, but the snow and rain prevented. We had to leave our wagons and carry our goods and pack through- we sent some of the company on for horses and provisions. Here we were out of provisions and had to resort to killing our poor cattle to live on. Father Brislim died in this mountain from fatigue and want- - even the women and children had to wade through this mountain (16 miles) in the water from ankle to waist deep. On the 12th day of December the men returned with some horses and flour. We started on horse back, only taking some few of our wearing clothes, and after enduring the most extreme hardships through mud and water we arrived in the settlements on the last day of December, completely used up- without wagons, cattle, bedding or tools. But, yet I feel rich, when I look around and see all of my family well, and all of our neighbors healthy and enjoying good health, I feel more than compensated for our loss and privations. I have not seen a sick person since I have been in the Territory. We have no billious fever, ague and fever, congestive chills, winter or lung fevers, liver complaint, nor any other diseases. The people are all perfectly healthy in this country.

I have taken a claim (one section) about 40 miles from the Wallamette Falls, up the valley, about 10 miles from the River on the east side. I have about 400 acres of the finest kind of prairie, and the rest of the section in the best kind of Oak, ash and fir timber, and one step will take you out of the best kind of prairie into the best kind of fir timber, where you can get from ten to fifteen rail cuts from one tree, and not be more than 15 or 20 inches through at the stump. The land is of a better quality here than I expected to see- - I think that the red or hilly land in this country is the best of wlient, though either is very good. What is called hilly land here is like your rolling prairies in the States that is the land that lays between the bottoms and the mountains. I have seen the best wheat here that I ever saw in any country it is as much better than your best wheat, as your best wheat is better than your poor spring wheat. They commence ploughing and putting in winter wheat the first of September, and continue on until the middle of March, and from then until the last of May for their spring wheat. It is not first rate for corn, thought they raise from 15 to 30 bushels to the acre. Potatoes grow fine, and the turnips are the best and largest in the world. I need not enter into a long detail of the different productions of this country, as it would be but a repetition of what you have all read and heard. The country is well adapted to the growth of fruit of all kinds, wild and tame. Wheat crops never fail in this country.

This past winter has been the hardest ever known by the American settlers. The ground was covered with snow for three or four weeks, though it did not seem like winter to me compared with Illinois, the cattle kept fat all the winter, no feeding of stock corn in this country. There has been four ships in this spring. Goods are tolerable cheap and coming down. Wheat is commanding $1 per bushel cash- - two ship loads went out of this valley last week, one for the Sandwich Islands and the other to the army in California and Mexico.

I want you to come to Oregon, there is room enough for you all-prepare yourselves with good strong two horse wagons, and good oxen and as many cows as you can bring safely-broodmares sell here very high- - start early and keep off of new routs. I find a number of Illinois acquaintances here, and some relations from Virginia and Kentucky. Young ladies are in great demand here, and that class of emigrants are received with open arms.

Yours, &c.,
RICE DUNBAR.

Of note: Rice Dunbar often addressed as Captain Rice Dunbar during the wagon travels west. Was this merely because he led his company of travellers? Or, was there any sort of military significance to this title? Some records, notably those of the Smith Family, who numbered about 36 and all travelled with Capt. Dunbar, indicate they arrived at Fort Hall on or about 8-Aug-1846. Mr. Thornton, after which that area in WA is likely named, arrived in WA ahead of Rice Dunbar, thereby being an 'earlier' settler, and possibly a more prominent one (hence the naming).

A full listing of information known upon his death can be found at:
http://www.open.org/pioneerc/pg13.html This is pretty much a summary of all the above information, and only a bit more.

In 1850 Census of Putnam Co, IL:

DUNBAR:
Hiram, aged 46, carpenter, b. VA
Jemima, aged 33 (wife), b. PA
John, aged 17, OH
Kezia, dau, 14, IL
Martha, aged 7, IL
Owen, aged 5, IL
Laura, aged 4, IL
Rice, aged 3, IL
Perry, age 3m, IL

This MIGHT indicate that "Rice" name in DUNBAR line does connect back to the VA lines. Ohio/VA is not a huge step, so suspect if our Rice was NOT born in VA, it's likely his father was... And, he MAY be cousin, or even brother to the above Hiram. He was born on 6 February 1802 at Hamilton or Brown, Ohio, USA. He married Jane Miller Brisbin, daughter of John Brisbin and Mary Miller, on 22 January 1830 at Morgan County, Illinois, USA. Rice Dunbar died on 15 September 1870 at Waldo Hills, Marion County, Oregon, USA, at age 68.

Children of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin
Elizabeth Dunbar b. c 1836
William Rice Dunbar+ b. Apr 1839
Emily Dunbar b. c 1840
Adalia R. Dunbar b. c 1842
Ralph Oregon Dunbar+ b. 26 Apr 1845, d. 19 Sep 1912
Oscar Dunbar b. c 1847
Elizabeth Dunbar b. c 1849

Jane Miller Brisbin (F)
b. 22 January 1809, d. 6 May 1858
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Dunbar. Jane Miller Brisbin was born on 22 January 1809 at Centre, Pennsylvania, USA. She was the daughter of John Brisbin and Mary Miller. Jane Miller Brisbin married Rice Dunbar on 22 January 1830 at Morgan County, Illinois, USA. Jane Miller Brisbin died on 6 May 1858 at Oregon, USA, at age 49.

Children of Jane Miller Brisbin and Rice Dunbar
Elizabeth Dunbar b. c 1836
William Rice Dunbar+ b. Apr 1839
Emily Dunbar b. c 1840
Adalia R. Dunbar b. c 1842
Ralph Oregon Dunbar+ b. 26 Apr 1845, d. 19 Sep 1912
Oscar Dunbar b. c 1847
Elizabeth Dunbar b. c 1849

John Brisbin (M)
b. 1781, d. 1846

     John Brisbin Very likely this is the Rev. Brisbin mentioned in Rice Dunbar's letter, or perhaps a brother or son of this man? He was born in 1781 at Pennsylvania, USA. He married Mary Miller in 1804 at Pennsylvania, USA. John Brisbin died in 1846 at Oregon, USA.

Child of John Brisbin and Mary Miller
Jane Miller Brisbin+ b. 22 Jan 1809, d. 6 May 1858

Mary Miller (F)
b. 1780, d. 1834

     Her married name was Brisbin. Mary Miller was born in 1780 at Pennsylvania, USA. She married John Brisbin in 1804 at Pennsylvania, USA. Mary Miller died in 1834 at Illinois, USA.

Child of Mary Miller and John Brisbin
Jane Miller Brisbin+ b. 22 Jan 1809, d. 6 May 1858

William White (M)

Child of William White
Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White+ b. 28 Jun 1852

William Rice Dunbar (M)
b. April 1839
Pop-up Pedigree

     William Rice Dunbar In 1900 US Census, listed as b. 1829 not 1839. In that year, in Vancouver, WA, he worked in the local land office.

A brief 'snippet' from:

PIONEER LINKS
A Tribute to WILLIAM RICE DUNBAR
Grand Master, 1884-5.
Grand Representative, 1886 to 1891.
By O. C. White, P. G. M.
A quarter of a century ago William Rice Dunbar was the strong man of'the Grand Lodge of Washington.
Entering that grand body in 1880 he at once took a prominent part, becoming Grand Master in 1884. Two years later he was elected Grand Representative and for six years served with honor in the Sovereign Grand Lodge. He had a most kindly disposition with a genial humor and a sparkling wit, which, added to a vast fund of information, made him an entertaining companion, and very popular with all classes of people. He was modest and unassuming to a degree and never used any
of the arts of the tricky politician to advance himself in the order. Being a man of strong convictions as to right and wrong, he applied to himself those rules with which he measured the conduct of others. He was a wise counselor, possessing a judicial mind which weighed all questions impartially in the scales of truth and reason. Often after some knotty question had been discussed without reaching a solution, being called upon, he would, in a few strong, well chosen sentences, clear the way to a
proper decision. He was patient under adverse criticism, even when assailed by envy and malice. (and it continues)

From the 'History of the Pacific Northwest - Oregon & Washington, 1889, Volume II, pages 310-311:

W.R. DUNBAR. - The mold in which a place is first cast is a great determining force in its future development. A quarter of a city which begins with mean buildings invites a class of neglectful or impecunious residents, and seldom outgrows its tendency towards squalor. The new settlers which come into a thriftless community sink more easily to the habits of their neighbors before them than they succeed in inciting those lax individuals to more industrious methods. On the other hand, also, thrift, vigor, a high level of public spirit and morality, leave a stamp which sets the tone and fashion of a city or neighborhood for many years. It is with peculiar satisfaction, therefore, that we find places like Goldendale which, from their very incipiency, have admitted nothing but strictly honorable pursuits, and have maintained a vigorous sentiment in favor of only the best things. These places become the augury of a high-minded generation in the future.

William Rice Dunbar, the subject of this sketch, is one of the men who have thus set the character of Goldendale. He is a man popularly known throughout the Northwest as a sterling worker in the cause of temperance. as a lecturer on this subject, as an organizer of lodges of Good Templars, and as a prominent officer of that order, he has met thousands of the people personally; and his form and voice are as familiar as that of any man on the coast. The service which he ahs done for Goldendale as a citizen he has performed for many other places as a lecturer and organizer.

He was born in Illinois in 1839. With his parents he came to Oregon in 1846, and is therefore, by education, a complete Oregonian. He lived upon his father's farm in the Waldo hills, but at the age of nineteen began the work of a temperance organizer. He joined the Sons of Temperance at Silverton in 1858. Two years later he was elected grand conductor, and the next year grand scribe. In 1864 he resigned this office to assist in raising a military company to help meet the exigencies of the government, then in its death grapple with secession. He was first to enlist in Company A, First Oregon Infantry. He was soon commissioned second lieutenant, and held that position until 1866. When mustered out, he was in command of the blockhouse on the Grande Ronde Indian Reservation in Yamhill county. That was General Phil Sheridan's old headquarters.

When he returned to civil life, Mr. Dunbar engaged in teaching on the reservation, and afterwards employed himself in the same way in the Waldo hills. He became a member of the Silver Lodge of the Good Templars. He was also active as solicitor of stock for the Oregon & California Railroad, which was then in prospect of construction. Returning to the reservation, he was soon transferred to the Warm Springs agency at the request of General Meacham. While at Grande Ronde agency he was elected to the Oregon legislature from his home county, Marion, and served during that session, 1870, in which Colonel Kelley was elected to the senate. Mr. Dunbar resigned his position in the Indian service in the autumn on account of the failing health of his wife.

As he was conspicuous in the Good Templar order, no one was better fitted than he for the office of grand worthy chief templar and grand lecturer; and he was elected as such in 1874. This position he held without opposition until 1879, when it became impossible for him to withhold his time longer from his own private affairs. In that year he selected Goldendale as his home, and in the following was appointed clerk of the district court. This office he held continuously until May, 1888, when he resigned the same. In 1882 he was appointed judge of the probate court; and so popular was his management of its business that he was elected to that office in the autumn of the same year and re-elected in 1884, again in 1886, and also at the last election in 1888.

Mr. Dunbar is also an Odd Fellow. He was grand master of that order in Washington Territory in 1884, and in 1886 and 1888 was representative to the sovereign grand lodge. He has been re-elected also for the next two years. He has also been mayor of Goldendale; and it is largely due to him that the record of the town for prohibition has been so nobly maintained.

In 1861 he was married to Miss Eliza A. Small; but this lady died a few years later, leaving one boy, Willie, who followed his mother in 1886, dying with consumption. Willie was clerk of the probate court of Klikitat county, Washington Territory, at the time of his death. In 1879 Mr. Dunbar was married to Miss Susy Dudley of Silverton, a lady of culture and recognized social position, who now does the honors of their home. Mr. Dunbar's life has been crowded with public duties and honors bestowed upon him because of merit, and also because of his ability to fulfill them in a dignified and effective manner.

In 1870, we find W.R. and Eliza (1st wife) and William C., listed in the following...

1870 US Census for Grande Ronde Indian Agency, Yamhill Co, OR:

DUNBAR:
W.R. 31, m, w, school teacher, IL
Eliza A., 29, f, w, keeping house, TN
William C., 6, m, w, Oregon. He was born in April 1839 at Illinois, USA. He was the son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin. William Rice Dunbar married Eliza Ann Small, daughter of T. H. Small, on 21 March 1861 at Washington, USA. William Rice Dunbar married Susan 'Susy' Dudley in 1878 or 1879 at Washington, USA.

Child of William Rice Dunbar and Eliza Ann Small
William 'Willie' C. Dunbar b. c 1864, d. 1886

Eliza Ann Small (F)
b. 14 March 1841, d. 18 September 1872
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Dunbar. Eliza Ann Small was born on 14 March 1841 at Tennessee. She was the daughter of T. H. Small. Eliza Ann Small married William Rice Dunbar, son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin, on 21 March 1861 at Washington, USA. Eliza Ann Small died on 18 September 1872 at Marion, Oregon, USA, at age 31.

Child of Eliza Ann Small and William Rice Dunbar
William 'Willie' C. Dunbar b. c 1864, d. 1886

William 'Willie' C. Dunbar (M)
b. circa 1864, d. 1886
Pop-up Pedigree

     William 'Willie' C. Dunbar Willie was clerk of the probate court of Klikitat county, Washington Territory, at the time of his death. He was born circa 1864 at Washington, USA. He was the son of William Rice Dunbar and Eliza Ann Small. William 'Willie' C. Dunbar died in 1886 at Washington, USA.

Susan 'Susy' Dudley (F)
b. October 1853

     Susan 'Susy' Dudley Susy also had a child, but it did not live long. She is listed as 1/0 in 1900 US Census, for Vancouver, Clark Co, WA, but William, in THAT record, listed b. 1829, not 1839! Her married name was Dunbar. She was born in October 1853 at Oregon, USA. She married William Rice Dunbar, son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin, in 1878 or 1879 at Washington, USA.

Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway (F)
b. circa 1886

     Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway Father born Ohio, mother, PA. Her married name was Dunbar. She was born circa 1886 at Washington, USA. She married Frederick Dunbar, son of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White, on 4 March 1913 at Portland, Multnomah Couny, Oregon, USA.

Children of Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway and Frederick Dunbar
William Dunbar (living)
Ralph Oregon Dunbar (living)

Gilbert W. Davis (M)
b. circa 1885, d. 26 October 1928
Pop-up Pedigree

     Gilbert W. Davis Gilbert apparently moved the family back to his home state of Minnesota, by 1920 US Census. He was born circa 1885 at Minnesota, USA. He was the son of Horace W. Davis and Ida UNKNOWN. Gilbert W. Davis married Ruth Martin Dunbar, daughter of Ralph Oregon Dunbar and Clarissa 'Clara' Ann White, circa 1910 at Washington, USA. Gilbert W. Davis died on 26 October 1928 at Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA.

Children of Gilbert W. Davis and Ruth Martin Dunbar
Horace Gilbert Davis (living)
Mary C. Davis (living)

Horace Gilbert Davis (M)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Horace Gilbert Davis is the son of Gilbert W. Davis and Ruth Martin Dunbar.

Ralph Oregon Dunbar (M)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Ralph Oregon Dunbar is the son of Frederick Dunbar and Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway.

William Dunbar (M)
Pop-up Pedigree

     William Dunbar is the son of Frederick Dunbar and Eva (Evalina Coneway) Conway.

Elizabeth Dunbar (F)
b. circa 1836
Pop-up Pedigree

     Elizabeth Dunbar was born circa 1836 at Illinois, USA. She was the daughter of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin.

Emily Dunbar (F)
b. circa 1840
Pop-up Pedigree

     Emily Dunbar was born circa 1840 at Illinois, USA. She was the daughter of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin.

Adalia R. Dunbar (F)
b. circa 1842
Pop-up Pedigree

     Adalia R. Dunbar Believed to be the A.R. Dunbar keeping house for her father, Rice, in 1870 Census of East Salem, Marion Co, OR. She was born circa 1842 at Illinois, USA. She was the daughter of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin.

Oscar Dunbar (M)
b. circa 1847
Pop-up Pedigree

     Oscar Dunbar was born circa 1847 at Oregon, USA. He was the son of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin.

Elizabeth Dunbar (F)
b. circa 1849
Pop-up Pedigree

     Elizabeth Dunbar was born circa 1849 at Oregon, USA. She was the daughter of Rice Dunbar and Jane Miller Brisbin.

Mrs. Rowe (F)

     Mrs. Rowe married Stephen Smith Rowe, son of Asa Mortimer Rowe and Lizzie N. Cornell, circa 1910 at Washington, USA. Mrs. Rowe and Stephen Smith Rowe were divorced before 1917 at Washington, USA.

Child of Mrs. Rowe and Stephen Smith Rowe
Virginia Rowe (living)

Elvira H. Wheat (F)
b. 1811, d. 27 November 1836
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Rowe. Elvira H. Wheat Most likely a daughter of either Josiah Wheat, Jr. or Joshua R. Wheat. She was born in 1811 at Grafton, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. She was the daughter of Joseph Wheat and Bridget Powers. Elvira H. Wheat married Smith Rowe, son of Daniel Rowe and Betsey Keyser, on 20 December 1835 at Grafton, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. Elvira H. Wheat died on 27 November 1836 at Grafton, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA.

Child of Elvira H. Wheat and Smith Rowe
Eilza Ann Rowe b. 1836

Eilza Ann Rowe (F)
b. 1836
Pop-up Pedigree

     Eilza Ann Rowe Wondering if Elvira died in childbirth of Eliza? Some sources indicate Eliza did not live long, herself. She was born in 1836 at Plymouth, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. She was the daughter of Smith Rowe and Elvira H. Wheat.

John S. Horner (M)
b. September 1867
Pop-up Pedigree

     John S. Horner John was a medical doctor in Pawlet, Vermont. He was born in September 1867 at Woodstock, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of William L. Horner and Abbie Ellen Rowe. John S. Horner married Mary B. UNKNOWN circa 1890.

Mary B. UNKNOWN (F)
b. July 1871

     Her married name was Horner. Mary B. UNKNOWN was born in July 1871 at Massachusetts, USA. She married John S. Horner, son of William L. Horner and Abbie Ellen Rowe, circa 1890.

Blanche C. Horner (F)
b. July 1869
Pop-up Pedigree

     Blanche C. Horner was born in July 1869 at Woodstock, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. She was the daughter of William L. Horner and Abbie Ellen Rowe.

Child of Blanche C. Horner and Herman Beebe Nelson
Herman Marshall Nelson (living)

Herman Beebe Nelson (M)
b. 14 January 1866

     Herman Beebe Nelson was born on 14 January 1866 at Rupert, Bennington County, Vermont, USA.

Child of Herman Beebe Nelson and Blanche C. Horner
Herman Marshall Nelson (living)

Herman Marshall Nelson (M)
Pop-up Pedigree

     Herman Marshall Nelson is the son of Herman Beebe Nelson and Blanche C. Horner.

George W. Horner (M)
b. circa 1872
Pop-up Pedigree

     George W. Horner was born circa 1872 at Woodstock, Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of William L. Horner and Abbie Ellen Rowe.

Joseph Wheat (M)
b. 18 July 1759, d. 22 October 1836

     Joseph Wheat was born on 18 July 1759 at Hollis, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA. He married Bridget Powers on 10 October 1783 at Hollis, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA. Joseph Wheat died on 22 October 1836 at Canaan, Grafton, New Hampshire, USA, at age 77.

Child of Joseph Wheat and Bridget Powers
Elvira H. Wheat+ b. 1811, d. 27 Nov 1836

Bridget Powers (F)
b. 5 September 1767, d. 19 October 1847

     Her married name was Wheat. Bridget Powers was born on 5 September 1767 at Hollis, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA. She married Joseph Wheat on 10 October 1783 at Hollis, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA. Bridget Powers died on 19 October 1847 at Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA, at age 80.

Child of Bridget Powers and Joseph Wheat
Elvira H. Wheat+ b. 1811, d. 27 Nov 1836

William Swaine (M)
b. 1644, d. April 1692
Pop-up Pedigree

     William Swaine was born in 1644 at Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of William Swaine and Prudence Marston. William Swaine married Mary Webster on 20 October 1676 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. William Swaine died in April 1692 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA.

Child of William Swaine and Mary Webster
Mehitable Swaine+ b. 21 Jun 1683, d. 2 Jul 1772

Mehitable Swaine (F)
b. 21 June 1683, d. 2 July 1772
Pop-up Pedigree

     Her married name was Rowe. Mehitable Swaine was born on 21 June 1683 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. She was the daughter of William Swaine and Mary Webster. Mehitable Swaine married Robert Rowe on 21 May 1708 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. Mehitable Swaine died on 2 July 1772 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA, at age 89.

Children of Mehitable Swaine and Robert Rowe
Daniel Rowe b. 8 Apr 1709
John Rowe+ b. 17 Apr 1711, d. 30 Aug 1757
Mary Rowe b. 6 Jun 1713
Paine Rowe b. 13 Dec 1716
Elizabeth Rowe b. 10 Jun 1719
Abigail Rowe b. 31 Jan 1722
Nathan Rowe b. 28 Jun 1725

Robert Rowe (M)
b. 1684, d. September 1757

     Robert Rowe was born in 1684 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. He married Mehitable Swaine, daughter of William Swaine and Mary Webster, on 21 May 1708 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. Robert Rowe died in September 1757 at Hampton Falls, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA.

Children of Robert Rowe and Mehitable Swaine
Daniel Rowe b. 8 Apr 1709
John Rowe+ b. 17 Apr 1711, d. 30 Aug 1757
Mary Rowe b. 6 Jun 1713
Paine Rowe b. 13 Dec 1716
Elizabeth Rowe b. 10 Jun 1719
Abigail Rowe b. 31 Jan 1722
Nathan Rowe b. 28 Jun 1725

Daniel Rowe (M)
b. 8 April 1709
Pop-up Pedigree

     Daniel Rowe was born on 8 April 1709 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of Robert Rowe and Mehitable Swaine.

John Rowe (M)
b. 17 April 1711, d. 30 August 1757
Pop-up Pedigree

     John Rowe was born on 17 April 1711 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of Robert Rowe and Mehitable Swaine. John Rowe married Leah Blake on 4 December 1735 at Hampton Falls, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. John Rowe died on 30 August 1757 at New Hampshire, USA, at age 46.

Child of John Rowe and Leah Blake
John Rowe b. 30 Jan 1737

Mary Rowe (F)
b. 6 June 1713
Pop-up Pedigree

     Mary Rowe was born on 6 June 1713 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. She was the daughter of Robert Rowe and Mehitable Swaine.

Paine Rowe (M)
b. 13 December 1716
Pop-up Pedigree

     Paine Rowe was born on 13 December 1716 at Hampton, Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. He was the son of Robert Rowe and Mehitable Swaine.

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Compiler:
Jared Handspicker
Nashua, NH, USA

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Site updated on 9 Mar 2007 at 1:54:55 PM from Jared Ancestry; 15,504 people